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October 25, 2020 | Faisal Shafi Watt

What after NEET?

Experts must come forward to help our students come out of an illusionary notion, of a fantasy world where success revolves round medicine, white coat and hospital

 

Soon after the result of prestigious NEET exam was out, Students securing the safe scores turned jubilant.  Shoiyb Aftaab, a boy from Orissa scripted the history with hundred percent score. Back in Kashmir, we too had a reason to feel proud for our teenagers, who despite braving all odds figured magical in the recently announced NEET results. Our students were struggling for over a year now, sandwiched in an obscure situation in the after math of abrogation of article 370 on one side and corona pandemic on other, most of the sincere aspirants were struggling for a space where they could actually reach to their mentors. The last hope of e-age too perished, unfortunately this time technology too showed them the back, as virtual classes lost to the ego of state. NEET aspirants from Kashmir were deprived of an important medium of high speed internet. This is from where the resilient character of an individual comes into play. Yes, the conviction to win it made all the difference. Surrender being no option inspired the aspirant to carry on.  

 

Our students worked hard and smart both pulled their skin out to persuade the odd circumstances. What is forcing me to write this piece is the mental health of students who couldn’t make it despite trying it multiple times. As teenagers these students are too tender to handle the peer group pressures. Right now, it is the moral duty of teachers and experts to address the problem to the core. As teachers we leave no stone unturned in cheering the students for clearing the exam but we hardly find the time for those who need us the most at this time. Experts must come forward to help our students come out of an illusionary notion, of a fantasy world where success revolves round medicine, white coat and hospital. In this column, I am concerned with those who couldn’t make it to a safe score in the NEET exam. Can they do me a favour of reading these precise lines carefully? I want them to be honest with themselves at least.  Do they really understand how to apply the reason of science while solving the problems from mechanics in Physics? Are they in a position to handle the highly reactive agents of organic chemistry? Do they understand the teacher in the world of Taxonomy or Physiology? If no, I have a hand folded request to all of them, in an objective based exam the reason has an instrumental role to play, our grades in the subjective board exam must not deceive us. I often see parents doing this mistake and thereby expecting not reachable things sometimes.

 

Why force our children in something they can’t master in. We live in a world of opportunities, gone are the days when the definition of being successful used to have a limited edition. If any of my student, despite trying hard, isn’t in a position to go through, what then? There is a diverse world waiting for him/her beyond Medicine and hospitals. We are witness to people who left Medicine to be bureaucrats later on. Let’s try to explore the world our way, our society needs professionals everywhere. We don’t have writers; we are in dire need of the real teachers, historians, politicians, leaders, entrepreneurs, poets, lawyers, editors, social researchers, sports stars, novelists, thinkers, and above all the well wishers for humanity at large. Dear students let’s build it together, let’s come out of the inferiority   complex now, Please for God’s sake. Come all and let’s have a new beginning as Allama Iqbal has rightly said:

 

Sitaroo say Agay Jahan Aur bee hain

Abee ishqi kay imtihaan Aur bee hain.

 

ibnishafi@rediffmail.com

 

 

Archive
October 25, 2020 | Faisal Shafi Watt

What after NEET?

Experts must come forward to help our students come out of an illusionary notion, of a fantasy world where success revolves round medicine, white coat and hospital

              

 

Soon after the result of prestigious NEET exam was out, Students securing the safe scores turned jubilant.  Shoiyb Aftaab, a boy from Orissa scripted the history with hundred percent score. Back in Kashmir, we too had a reason to feel proud for our teenagers, who despite braving all odds figured magical in the recently announced NEET results. Our students were struggling for over a year now, sandwiched in an obscure situation in the after math of abrogation of article 370 on one side and corona pandemic on other, most of the sincere aspirants were struggling for a space where they could actually reach to their mentors. The last hope of e-age too perished, unfortunately this time technology too showed them the back, as virtual classes lost to the ego of state. NEET aspirants from Kashmir were deprived of an important medium of high speed internet. This is from where the resilient character of an individual comes into play. Yes, the conviction to win it made all the difference. Surrender being no option inspired the aspirant to carry on.  

 

Our students worked hard and smart both pulled their skin out to persuade the odd circumstances. What is forcing me to write this piece is the mental health of students who couldn’t make it despite trying it multiple times. As teenagers these students are too tender to handle the peer group pressures. Right now, it is the moral duty of teachers and experts to address the problem to the core. As teachers we leave no stone unturned in cheering the students for clearing the exam but we hardly find the time for those who need us the most at this time. Experts must come forward to help our students come out of an illusionary notion, of a fantasy world where success revolves round medicine, white coat and hospital. In this column, I am concerned with those who couldn’t make it to a safe score in the NEET exam. Can they do me a favour of reading these precise lines carefully? I want them to be honest with themselves at least.  Do they really understand how to apply the reason of science while solving the problems from mechanics in Physics? Are they in a position to handle the highly reactive agents of organic chemistry? Do they understand the teacher in the world of Taxonomy or Physiology? If no, I have a hand folded request to all of them, in an objective based exam the reason has an instrumental role to play, our grades in the subjective board exam must not deceive us. I often see parents doing this mistake and thereby expecting not reachable things sometimes.

 

Why force our children in something they can’t master in. We live in a world of opportunities, gone are the days when the definition of being successful used to have a limited edition. If any of my student, despite trying hard, isn’t in a position to go through, what then? There is a diverse world waiting for him/her beyond Medicine and hospitals. We are witness to people who left Medicine to be bureaucrats later on. Let’s try to explore the world our way, our society needs professionals everywhere. We don’t have writers; we are in dire need of the real teachers, historians, politicians, leaders, entrepreneurs, poets, lawyers, editors, social researchers, sports stars, novelists, thinkers, and above all the well wishers for humanity at large. Dear students let’s build it together, let’s come out of the inferiority   complex now, Please for God’s sake. Come all and let’s have a new beginning as Allama Iqbal has rightly said:

 

Sitaroo say Agay Jahan Aur bee hain

Abee ishqi kay imtihaan Aur bee hain.

 

ibnishafi@rediffmail.com

 

 

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